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  1. #1

    Lighting, filming or post

    I want a scene I am going to film to look like it was filmed in a bar (lighting wise). Low warm light, shadows on the “talent’s” faces (but not completely dark shadows). If you have seen “After The Catch”, that is the look I want.

    Should I light the scene nice and bright, with light shadows and adjust it in post, or adjust the lighting and camera’s so that it looks like what I want when it’s filmed?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    My gut feeling is to always shoot with the lighting you want to achieve the right effect.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  3. #3

    That was my thought, but...

    That was my thought, but whenever I have seen "The making Of..." the scene always seems much more brightly lit than the final product. However, it certainly could have looked much different to the camera that captured the actual shot.

    I assume it is better to err on the side of too much light than not enough?

    Does shooting with a simple consumer camcorder make any difference?

    Thanks.

  4. #4
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    Quote
    Quote: Hitech
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    I assume it is better to err on the side of too much light than not enough?
    Not necessarily, in fact there's a good argument to say that you can increase the levels of an underexposed image in post, but if the image is too hot (overexposed) then you're stuffed. It won't hurt to have a little too much exposure and bring it back a little in post but be very careful - push it too far and you'll have an unsalvageable image.

    Quote
    Quote: Hitech
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    Does shooting with a simple consumer camcorder make any difference?
    Yes, a consumer camera will typically have a smaller lens and less dynamic range, meaning that you're going to lose detail in the brightest and darkest areas of the image. You want to the best dynamic range possible - this not only gives you a nicer, more natural image, but it gives you a lot more wiggle-room when it comes to brightening or darkening the image in post.

    I wouldn't pay too much attention to the exposure in "making of" footage. These shots are intended for a different situation and aren't an attempt to replicate the lighting that would be seen in the film itself.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  5. #5
    Thanks. This is going to be the first time I have ever tried to control the lighting (and exposure for that matter). At least now I have some idea what to look for. Thanks again.

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