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  1. #1
    Geoff
    Guest

    Editing Pre Production

    Hi I’m a student doing a research project on the “pre-postproduction” process of editing. Just wondering what people do before they begin the full edit. If anyone could answer some or all of these questions I would be stoked.
    Do you know any DVD’s with special post production features looking at editing preparation? I know Riding Giants has one.
    You find out that you have an editing job what’s your first action?
    How much research is needed into the area you will be cutting?
    What role does a schedule have in your initial planning?
    What role does a paper edit have in your productions?
    What are you looking to learn from your rough cut? Timing information? Enough Visual Coverage?
    Do you usually use either of these (paper edit/rough cut)?
    What planning can, or do, you do to help the editing process run smoother down the track?

    Thanks a lot
    Geoff

  2. #2
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    Hi Geoff,

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    Quote: Geoff
    Do you know any DVD’s with special post production features looking at editing preparation?
    Sorry, no.

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    Quote: Geoff
    You find out that you have an editing job what’s your first action?
    Review the editing brief. It tells me things like how long the finished product needs to be, what footage I'm working with and all the specific requirements.

    Quote
    Quote: Geoff
    How much research is needed into the area you will be cutting?
    Not much really. It's usually fairly self-explanatory. Almost all the research is done in pre-production - by the time editing starts it's just a case of putting it all together.

    Quote
    Quote: Geoff
    What role does a schedule have in your initial planning?
    I'm not sure exactly what you mean. What sort of schedule?

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    Quote: Geoff
    What role does a paper edit have in your productions?
    Sometimes it's very important, but sometimes we don't have one at all. We tend to spend more time on the paper edit if the job is long, complex or unusual. For simple jobs we just make some quick notes and launch staight into it.

    Quote
    Quote: Geoff
    What are you looking to learn from your rough cut? Timing information? Enough Visual Coverage?
    Timing certainly. General feel, pacing of the shots, etc.

    Quote
    Quote: Geoff
    Do you usually use either of these (paper edit/rough cut)?
    I don't think the "rough cut" isn't the same as it used to be. When I started in this game a rought cut was always done and was very separate from the final cut, but that's largely because technology was so different. These days I start with a rough cut but instead of finishing it and starting the final cut, the rough cut just slowly develops into the final cut.

    Quote
    Quote: Geoff
    What planning can, or do, you do to help the editing process run smoother down the track?
    I tried to think of some good things to say to this but I couldn't really. Basically, the earlier things are planned the better and I like to think most of the necessary planning was done way back in pre-production. I don't want to be doing much planning at all in post. I suppose I like to capture all the footage in an orderly fashion and get it arranged in the project bin so it's easy to access, but I don't know if that counts as planning.

    I hope this helps a little bit. Good luck with the project.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  3. #3
    Geoff
    Guest

    Thanks

    Yeah helps heaps ery good?
    As I've been researching more I've come across some more questions that seem to have varied answers from books etc.
    Do you think you should capture all the footage or just certain bits?
    Does the editor have to be the one capturing or can you get a jounoir to do it?
    Do you batch capture or captpure and make sub clips from there?
    I've seen some books say titles for a shot should only be 8 characters long (somethinhg to do with the comp generatedf EDL) do you agree?
    Does the editor of dir/producer log the footage?
    Thanks heaps
    Geoff

  4. #4
    Administrator Dave's Avatar
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    For most of these questions I don't think there is a single correct answer. Different production environments have different systems and requirements. The answers I give are based on my own experience and opinions but other people may disagree.
    Quote
    Quote: Geoff
    Do you think you should capture all the footage or just certain bits?
    Depends on the project but in most cases I would try to capture only the footage I might need and try to leave out shots I know I won't want. However in some cases it's easier to just leave the capture going and get it all rather than stopping and starting all the time.

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    Quote: Geoff
    Does the editor have to be the one capturing or can you get a jounoir to do it?
    Anyone can do it as long as they know what they are doing.
    Quote
    Quote: Geoff
    Do you batch capture or captpure and make sub clips from there?
    I use a mixture. There is no one system that always works the best. Sometimes I capture a whole lot of individual shot files, sometimes I capture two hours worth of footage in a single file and cut it up from there.
    Quote
    Quote: Geoff
    I've seen some books say titles for a shot should only be 8 characters long (somethinhg to do with the comp generatedf EDL) do you agree?
    Different systems have different requirements and limits on characters. You need to know the requirements of the system you are working with. Some EDLs also need to be saved with a file name 8 characters or less. I suppose it's good practice to get into the habit of using 8 characters.
    Quote
    Quote: Geoff
    Does the editor of dir/producer log the footage?
    I think I've seen all these people log footage at some stage. Logging can be done by anyone from the camera operator to the producer - it will depend on the practices of the production house. In the case of the channel I work for, the camera operator (or soundie) will provide a shot log for the editor, then the editor will capture and log shots to the edit system.
    Dave Owen
    MediaCollege.com

  5. #5
    Senior Member SC358's Avatar
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    Hey Geoff - I hope you don't mind if I shed some light based on my own experiences. I've been involved in many aspects of production. Even though I've done very little operationally, I consider myself blessed with the opportunities to interact, be on the sideline and ask pertinent questions and just observe.
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    Quote: Geoff
    Do you know any DVD’s with special post production features looking at editing preparation? I know Riding Giants has one.
    I haven't reached the point where I get to choose the tools for post production or the medium. In general, your choice of medium is your own decision for your own purposes. The creators/developers of the editing system will (or sometimes should) provide an interface with any and all types of external equipment to be reassured that they can make their sale. Hopefully they're the type of company that you can also work with to provide you with solutions should you come across a situation that they haven't ironed out.
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    Quote: Geoff
    You find out that you have an editing job what’s your first action?
    Making sure I have a comfy chair... Assuming you had a previous meeting with the Director and Producer, review all paper work from the production and compare notes from the meeting. Situations and ideas change - sometimes without warning.
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    Quote: Geoff
    How much research is needed into the area you will be cutting?
    Very little in regards to the actual project. Much more to learn how to streamline your time and efforts to prevent useless redundancy.
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    Quote: Geoff
    What role does a schedule have in your initial planning.?
    Schedule? As in work schedule? Expect to work long hours. Have backup or alternative plans in your personal life. If it's a schedule of materials to be released from the production - you remain on the waiting list. You don't get to work until your provided with some thing that the producer/director is willing for you to prep.
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    Quote: Geoff
    What role does a paper edit have in your productions?
    Paper or electronic trail doesn't matter as long as it is accurate. Special notations are of great help!
    Quote
    Quote: Geoff
    What are you looking to learn from your rough cut? Timing information? Enough Visual Coverage?
    Sometimes inspiration or a different angle of story telling but in general, yes to all.
    Quote
    Quote: Geoff
    Do you usually use either of these (paper edit/rough cut)?
    That all depends if production is still ongoing. If not, then the Producer/Director will have (or should have) all the paperwork
    Quote
    Quote: Geoff
    What planning can, or do, you do to help the editing process run smoother down the track?
    As a no brainer - you really have to be well organized whether your the editor or assistant or assistant to the assistant. Information needs to be seconds or less away. If there is any doubt of anything - listen to your instinct and get it resolved asap so that it isn't a brick wall when you hit it but something you can leap over.

    As the saying goes, "You're only as good as your last project." When it's all said and done, hopefully there's a party at the end of the tunnel waiting for you.
    SC358
    Relationships are based on compromises - behavior accepted is behavior repeated.

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